Log 44

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Renee kemp-rotan and ludovico Centis evaluate monuments to the complicated American histories of racial injustice and nuclear weapons development. Alicia imperiale and christophe Van Gerrewey explore works by Luigi Moretti and OMA. George baird and xx voto respond to Log 42: Disorienting Phenomenology and ANY 4: Architecture and the Feminine, respectively.

In the 15th anniversary issue of log, architects representing diverse perspectives each question, number 44, in different ways, the place of architecture and architectural discourse in the world today. As 2018 venice biennale golden lion recipient kenneth frampton asks, for posthuman, in Zack Saunders s response to the exhibition digitaldisobediences, What are architects for in a destitute time? Similarly, François Roche wonders, postqueers, postdummies .

Log 44 #ad - What does it mean to be an architect? in this issue, rafael moneo searches for a new historical paradigm no longer centered on modernism; Jesse Reiser and Nanako Umemoto evaluate the forces that shape their architectural project; Pier Vittorio Aureli offers a comprehensive history of the way the grid has been used to organize the socioeconomics of cities; Michelle Chang proposes vagueness as a critical position and source of creativity; and Michael Meredith curates 44 low-resolution houses.

. Log 44 also takes stock of the world trade center site 15 years after the competition to rebuild Ground Zero in an interview with Daniel Libeskind and an analysis by Fred Bernstein.

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Log 45

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Plus, deborah fausch on the writing of the late robert venturi; Dora Epstein Jones on the phenomena of populated plans; Cameron Cortez on a misplaced microwave in Japan; and Graham McKay on Kazuo Shinohara s artful houses. From pritzker prize laureate wang shu on song dynasty landscape paintings to Elizabeth Diller on orchestrating an opera on the High Line, architects thinking transformatively and reflecting critically are at the heart of Log 45 Winter/Spring 2019.

This issue also features reviews of a number of recent books: Henry N. In this open issue, curators, from paola antonelli on curating broken nature at the Milan Triennale, to Peter Trummer on an inoperable Anthropocene window; from Stephan Trüby on right-wing reconstruction efforts in Germany, architects, and critics observe the world at both the large and small scale, to Patrick Templeton on Adjacencies at Yale.

Log 45 #ad - Cobb reflects on the role of philosophy in schinkel; jeffrey kipnis analyzes cobb s own newly published memoir; Lars Lerup responds to a Call to Order; Caspar Pearson compares two books produced for the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale; David Erdman introduces Possible Mediums; and Douglas Hartig tackles MOS Architects forthcoming children s book.

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Log 43

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Log 46

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Log 46 also features a number of pieces that rethink architectural surfaces: Ivi Diamantopoulou challenges architects to look up at the ceiling, Camilo José Vergara documents anonymous street art, Patrick Templeton reports on a drawing machine, and Adam Longenbach empowers misreadings of the US-Mexico border wall.

. In this open issue, david gissen discusses new research on ancient civilizations; Viola Ago assesses compositional physics; Sharel Liu investigates how coliving spaces attempt to build community; Jimenez Lai explores architects relationships with irony and sincerity; Charles Waldheim revisits the avant-garde qualities of the airport jet bridge; and Mark Foster Gage and Michael Meredith spar over categories in architecture.

Log 46 #ad - This issue also includes fiction by david heymann, a new appraisal of dante and bramante by pier paolo tamburelli, an interview with OMA s Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli by Andrés Ramirez, book reviews by Edward Eigen and Philip Ursprung, a letter from Bangkok by François Roche, a look at the TWA Hotel by Cynthia Davidson, and Thomas Daniell s translation of Tadao Ando's first published essay.

From classical sculpture to video game graphics, log 46 Summer 2019 brings together architects, and historians, artists, both new and established voices, from Renaissance frescoes to Instagrammable buildings, who examine the multiple forces that shape architectural discourse.

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Log 38

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Plus: post-brexit reactions from shumi bose, and invisible architecture, urban data centers, Drake, and James Taylor-Foster And observations on sounds, Mario Carpo, Jack Self, Patrik Schumacher, Odile Decq, and more . Cynthia davidson s expansive interview with new york architect Harry Cobb, of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, illuminates Cobb s 60-plus years in practice, as well as the history of modernism in America.

. Eve blau explores the contexts that drove the 1968 learning from Las Vegas studio at Yale, and Pier Vittorio Aureli and Maria Shéhérazade Giudici reevaluate the archaeological roots of modern domestic space. Log 38 also features critical perspectives on the current moment in architecture, and reactions to Brexit from architects and educators affected by the vote, with reviews of OMA s Fondaco dei Tedeschi, reflections on this year s Venice Architecture Biennale, and even includes an imaginative look at the work of Sam Jacob Studio from 20 years in the future.

Log 38 #ad - In this issue: pier vittorio aureli and maria shéhérezade giudici interrogate home, marco de michelis sends dispatches from the front, Amelia Hazinski travels through Sam Jacob s time, Eve Blau learns from 1960s pedagogy and politics, Thomas Kelley explodes a log cabin, Brendan Bashin-Sullivan meets a survivor, Manfredo di Robilant pages through Yona Friedman, Cynthia Davidson gets the story from Harry Cobb, Andrew Holder seeks sufficient density, Léa-Catherine Szacka excavates OMA s Fondaco.

After two successive thematic issues, Log 38 Fall 2016 returns to its classic open form, bringing together myriad perspectives from architecture s center and periphery.

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Log 39

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Anyone Corporation #ad - This issue features incisive commentary by critics and historians on recently completed buildings from BIG s VIA 57 West and WORKac s 93 Reade Street in New York to Herzog & de Meuron s Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg to Archi-Depot, a museum dedicated to architecture models in Tokyo. In this issue: brendan bashin-sullivan detects the stealth building, michael meredith mugs for indifference, matthew mullane inventories a Tokyo warehouse, Eric Owen Moss finds the Architect s Gospel, Brooke Gladstone networks with Vishaan Chakrabarti, Luka Skansi recontextualizes FLOTUS s roots, Hanno Rauterberg scales the Elbphilharmonie, Elisa Iturbe visits the space of the border, Vale ry Didelon rides the train to Euralille, Emmanuel Petit takes measure of VIA 57 West, and Jesu s Vassallo smudges realism in photography.

. Log 39 looks at a changed political landscape and an evolving urban environment, offering reflections on architecture and the contemporary city both in the United States and around the world. And observations on an Iranian villa and a shiny new subway. In addition, michael meredith, vale ry didelon, the history and future of OMA s 1989 Euralille masterplan, and Eric Owen Moss contribute writing on the aesthetic of indifference, and a pseudo-scripture for architects.

Log 39 #ad - In a special section, practitioners, critics, and activists address the possibility of architecture in the age of Trump. Plus: reflections on architecture in the age of trump from joseph altshuler & julia sedlock, Gabriel Fuentes, Iman Ansari, Keller Easterling, Micah Rutenberg, Ian Caine, Galo Canizares, George Foufas & George Papam, the Architecture Lobby, Albert Pope, Roberto Otero, and Tyler Survant & Mark Talbot.

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Not Interesting: On the Limits of Criticism in Architecture

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Applied Research & Design #ad - Not interesting proposes another set of terms and structures to talk about architecture, without requiring that it be interesting. In addition to text, the book contains over 50 case studies using 100 drawings and images. This book explores a set of alternatives to the interesting and imagines how architecture might be positioned more broadly in the world using other terms: boring, confusing, and comforting.

Each chapter introduces its topic through an analysis of a different image, which serves to unpack the specific character of each term and its relationship to architecture. These are presented in parallel to the text and show what architecture may look like through the lens of these other terms. Along with interesting, these three terms make up the four chapters of the book.

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The Formal Basis of Modern Architecture

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Lars Müller Publishers #ad - First published in 2006 and now rare, and originally written as a dissertation in 1963, The Formal Basis of Modern Architecture is the acclaimed American architect Peter Eisenman's masterly formal analysis of architecture. The formal basis of modern architecture was eisenman's dissertation at the University of Cambridge, and was first published as a facsimile edition by Lars Müller Publishers in 2006; that edition is now reprinted in a smaller format.

Peter eisenman born 1932 is an internationally recognized architect and educator. Eisenman is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Among other awards, in 2001 he received the medal of honor from the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, and the Smithsonian Institution's 2001 Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award in Architecture.

Prior to establishing a full-time architectural practice in 1980, Eisenman worked as an independent architect, educator and theorist. I wanted to write an analytic work that related what i had learned to see, from Raphael to Guido Reni, into some theoretical construct that would bear on modern architecture, from Palladio to Terragni, but from the point of view of a certain autonomy of form.

The Formal Basis of Modern Architecture #ad - Here, eisenman―world famous for his holocaust Memorial in Berlin 2005―confronts historicism with theory and the analysis of form, illustrating his observations with numerous precisely executed drawings. In 1967, an international think tank for architecture in New York, he founded the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies IAUS, and served as its director until 1982.

He was awarded the golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2004 Venice Architecture Biennale.

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Log 36

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Rather than providing easy answers or touting cutting-edge technologies, ROBOLOG offers provocations to both architects and theorists. In addition to a collection of thought-provoking essays, this issue includes conversations with Elizabeth Diller, Nicholas de Monchaux and Ken Goldberg, and Chuck Hoberman.

Log 36 #ad - Guest edited by architect greg lynn, log 36: ROBOLOG explores the challenges and potentials posed to architecture by the rapidly accelerating field of robotics. Robotic sensors, actuators, and networks have fundamentally transformed the world around us. What will architecture choose to do with them? Tossing aside the usual fabrication-focused discourse around robots, the 23 contributors to ROBOLOG investigate topics ranging from hyperrealistic robotic drag queens to machine vision to buildings that move.

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Are We Human? Notes on an Archaeology of Design

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Lars Müller #ad - Even the planet itself has been completely encrusted by design as a geological layer. It becomes the way humans ask questions and thereby continuously redesign themselves. Colomina’s and wigley’s field notes offer an archaeology of the way design has gone viral and is now bigger than the world. The question are We Human? is both urgent and ancient.

Lars M ller. They range across the last few hundred thousand years and the last few seconds to scrutinize the uniquely plastic relation between brain and artifact. There is no longer an outside to the world of design. Beatriz colomina and mark wigley offer a multilayered exploration of the intimate relationship between human and design and rethink the philosophy of design in a multi-dimensional exploration from the very first tools and ornaments to the constant buzz of social media.

Are We Human? Notes on an Archaeology of Design #ad - Design is what makes the human. The average day involves the experience of thousands of layers of design that reach to outside space but also reach deep into our bodies and brains. A vivid portrait emerges.

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X-ray Architecture

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Lars Müller Publishers #ad - Lars M ller. It challenges the normal understanding of modern architecture by proposing that the architecture of the early 20th century was shaped by the dominant medical obsession of its time: tuberculosis and its primary diagnostic tool, the X-ray. Colomina suggests that if we want to talk about the state of the art in buildings, we should look to the dominant obsessions about illness and the latest techniques of imaging the body―and ask what effects they may have on the way we conceive architecture.

Beatriz colomina is founding director of the program in Media and Modernity at Princeton University and Professor in the School of Architecture. Modern architects presented their architecture as a kind of medical instrument for protecting and enhancing the body. X-ray technology and modern architecture were born around the same time and evolved in parallel.

X-ray Architecture #ad - She has written extensively on the interrelationships between architecture, art, media, sexuality and health. If architectural discourse has from its beginning associated building and body, the body that it describes is the medical body, reconstructed by each new theory of health. This book explores the impact of medical discourse and diagnostic technologies on the formation, representation and reception of modern architecture.

While the x-ray exposed the inside of the body to the public eye, the modern building unveiled its interior, inverting the relationship between private and public. How our medical obsessions and the image of the body influence modern architecture.

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